Steven Universe: Episodes 1-4
The Plot: Steven is an energetic chubby little boy who lives in a van in Beach City with his ex-rocker jack-of-all-trades dad. He spends his days tagging along with his dead mom’s three friends: stoic square-afro’d Garnet, neurotic ballerina Pearl, and mischevious slob Amethyst. The ladies are warriors who protect the Earth from evil by using the magic gems embedded in their bodies, and Steven has a gem too, though he’s still figuring out how to use it.
Is This A Magical Girl Show?: Alas, no, not even a little bit.
The protagonist is a dude, so immediately disqualified. But maybe it counts as a Magical Boy show? Well…
No secrecy, and no dual identities.
Steven was (apparently?) born on Earth amongst the muggles, but he was born with magical abilities and (apparently?) knew about them all along, so he doesn’t fit with the usual Magic Warrior formula.
Basically, this show doesn’t follow any of the Magical Girl genre rules. It just does its own thing.
Is It Any Good?: OMG IT’S THE BEST EVERRRR. I so so wish it counted as a MG show just so I’d have an excuse to gush about it on this blog.
Even so, if you like MG shows, you will probably love Steven Universe. It’s got ladies kicking butt, ladies talking to each other, ladies having developed personalities and diverse body types, and Steven makes for a wonderful protagonist — basically the little brother we all wish we had. The show also strikes a good balance with his role as the tagalong team-member: so far, he’s not the annoying millstone always creating more work for the heroines, nor does he hog the spotlight while the more skilled and experienced heroines stand around picking their noses. Plus, the action scenes, the visual design, the colors, the humor, the voice acting — they’re all great. So go watch it! WATCH ITTTTT. *smushes your face in it*

Steven Universe: Episodes 1-4

The Plot: Steven is an energetic chubby little boy who lives in a van in Beach City with his ex-rocker jack-of-all-trades dad. He spends his days tagging along with his dead mom’s three friends: stoic square-afro’d Garnet, neurotic ballerina Pearl, and mischevious slob Amethyst. The ladies are warriors who protect the Earth from evil by using the magic gems embedded in their bodies, and Steven has a gem too, though he’s still figuring out how to use it.

Is This A Magical Girl Show?: Alas, no, not even a little bit.

  • The protagonist is a dude, so immediately disqualified. But maybe it counts as a Magical Boy show? Well…
  • No secrecy, and no dual identities.
  • Steven was (apparently?) born on Earth amongst the muggles, but he was born with magical abilities and (apparently?) knew about them all along, so he doesn’t fit with the usual Magic Warrior formula.
  • Basically, this show doesn’t follow any of the Magical Girl genre rules. It just does its own thing.

Is It Any Good?: OMG IT’S THE BEST EVERRRR. I so so wish it counted as a MG show just so I’d have an excuse to gush about it on this blog.

Even so, if you like MG shows, you will probably love Steven Universe. It’s got ladies kicking butt, ladies talking to each other, ladies having developed personalities and diverse body types, and Steven makes for a wonderful protagonist — basically the little brother we all wish we had. The show also strikes a good balance with his role as the tagalong team-member: so far, he’s not the annoying millstone always creating more work for the heroines, nor does he hog the spotlight while the more skilled and experienced heroines stand around picking their noses. Plus, the action scenes, the visual design, the colors, the humor, the voice acting — they’re all great. So go watch it! WATCH ITTTTT. *smushes your face in it*

thisishowiswog said: Don’t know if Steven Universe is considered a magical girl serie (even if the protagonist is a little boy). And I don’t know if it is american but it is doing success isn’t it? And it is pretty much girly and magical show isn’t it?

Steven Universe is indeed American, but the reason it can get away with all that magical-girl-ing and WOC leads is because it has a White Male Protagonist™.

As for whether it’s a Magical Girl show or not, I haven’t seen much of it yet, but I’d say it’s automatically disqualified because of the aforementioned male protagonist, which is too bad because it looks AWESOME and I’d love to have an excuse to talk about it on this blog. Actually, if it were Japanese, I’d classify it as a Magical Harem show, sort of like Negima. Lulz.

titleknown asked:

If one wanted to try and produce a magical girl series in the USA, what'd be your advice on how to pitch it and what sort of elements would you include in the story to make it more sellable/marketable/popular for a US audience?

Oh dear. My first advice would be “Move to another country.” Or if that’s not an option, “Make it all yourself, probably in Flash, and put it on the internet.” Because the only way to make a broadcast MG show “sellable” in the US is to replace the Magical Girls with men in spandex.

Seriously though, I don’t know quite how it happened, but American TV execs have developed a severe allergy to girl-aimed fare and especially to shows with a girl as the protagonist, let alone multiple female protagonists. Women talking to each other! Nooooooo we’re all gonna die! Once upon a time we had Powerpuff Girls and Totally Spies and the dubs of Sailor Moon and Winx, but nowadays, not so much.

However, if by some miracle you found an exec who could handle the “women talking to each other and saving the world” premise without bursting into tears, I’d have a few suggestions for retooling the genre to make it more Amurrican:

  1. Cut out all that kawaii desu shit. Remember, American Kirby Is Hardcore. The show can still be cute, but in a more Americanish way. (See PPG, Adventure Time, and the new MLP for art-style, tone, and character personality references.)
  2. Multi-racial cast. A no-brainer in this day and age. It’d be especially cool if the heroine herself was a WOC and— oh come on, Mr. TV Exec, there’s no need to roll into fetal position, it was just a suggestion!
  3. Fewer stock footage attacks. American animated shows have bigger budgets than Japanese ones so I think we can afford more fighting and less stock-footaging. Stock footage henshins are still okay, but you might want to use them less often, and keep them concise.
  4. Keep the speeches short. The “In the Name of the Moon” speech, the greyskull phrase, and the attack names are all things American children tend to mock, so if you’re including them, keep them short and minimally ridiculous. On the other hand, if you’re doing a parody or gag show, make them extra-ridiculous.
  5. Dial down the lesbians? Dial up the lesbians? I’m really not sure. On the one hand, large swathes of America are still very resistant to any mention of gay people in media aimed at TEH CHILDREN. On the other hand, the times they are a-changing, and rapidly. It’s definitely something you’d need to think about.
  6. No het romance allowed, if you want boys to watch the show. If you don’t care about multi-demo appeal, then feel free to Tuxedo Mask to your heart’s content.
  7. Don’t make the heroine a dithering airhead. I’m thinking back to the heroines of Western shows like PPG, Totally Spies, MLP, Winx, even Angel’s Friends, and they’re all pretty competent. Better to make the heroine in the mold of those ladies than in the “this loser is you” mold.

That’s all I can think of at the moment.

Anonymous asked:

How many green magical girls are there?

Surprisingly, a lot! I always think of green as being the last resort color (because it is in the Precure franchise), but the dude-aimed shows seem to like it. And now, allow me to flex my nerd-muscles by naming all the green Magical Girls:

Sailor Jupiter and Sailor Neptune (sea green), Umi Fuu from Rayearth, that chick from Super Doll Licca, that other chick from Cyberteam, Corrector Haruna, the glasses chick from ALSFS, Mew Lettuce and Mew Mint (sea green), Rina from MerMelo, the elegant chick from Sweet Valerian, the buckskin fringe chick from CosPrayers, Shamal from Nanoha, the twins from Happy 7, somebody from Gedou Otome Tai, the evil witch from Majokko Tsukune, Nina and Nao from Mai-Otome, the deadpan chick from Sasami MG Club, Buttercup from PPGZ, Sleeping Beauty from Otogi Jushi Akazukin, the brunette from Rakugo Tennyo Oyui, Alice from Moetan, Cure Mint, the glasses chick from Kiruminzoo, the loud blonde chick from Jewelpet Twinkle, Dead Master from BRS, Cure March, the samurai chick from Vividred, the moon chick from Daybreak Illusion, the huge-boobed chick from Hyperdimension Neptunia, and one of the minions from Symphogear 2.

The heroines of Shugo Chara and Corrector Yui also have alternate outfits that are green.

And if we’re including pornos, then Venus 5, Sweet Knights, and Sex Warrior Pudding have one green lady each.

sailor-rurouni asked:

Hi, I am a big fan of your magical girl project! I was hoping you could help me out with something potentially (or not) related to magical girls. I was reading up on some older magical girls, Himitsu no Akko-chan and Mahoutsukai Sally, and while I was reading about them, I saw mention of Ribon no Kishi/Princess Knight, which Wikipedia has even categorised as magical girl. Not having read it myself, I was wondering if you would consider it a magical girl series. It just seems shoujo to me.

I would say that no, Princess Knight is not Magical Girl for one simple reason: She doesn’t have magical powers. Oh, plenty of magical things happen to her, but she never uses magic as a tool or weapon.

However, it’s true that Princess Knight laid the groundwork for the Magical Girl genre: Sapphire has multiple identities that she must keep secret, and her cute angel sidekick, Choppy, can be seen as a precursor to early MG sidekicks like Sally’s assistant Cub or Chappy’s little brother Jun.

By the way, everything I’m saying here is based on the manga; I haven’t seen the anime, so maybe it’s radically different.

Tantei Opera Milky Holmes: Episodes 1-4
The Plot: Milky Holmes are a quartet of airheaded moeblobs attending a school for superpowered detectives. They’re the stars of the school until they randomly lose their powers during a fight with stripperiffic arch-rival Arsene. The girls’ depowered state gives them a perfect excuse to blow off all that tedious crime-fighting and mystery-solving, instead opting to fart around and do moe shit all day. Seriously, if you are a fan of any of the famous detectives name-dropped in this series, this is absolutely the last show you’ll want to watch.
Is This A Magical Girl Show?: Nope. I’m booting it out of the project.
There’s no secrecy, no transformations, and no dual identities, except for the villains. Plus, while the heroines have magical powers, they lose them in the first episode and spend the series as muggles, which sort of kills the whole point of a Magical Girl show, i.e. a show about girls who use magic.
On the flip side, Arsene is a personality-switching rival in the same mold as Pixy Misa, and her minions all do the Clark Kenting thing, working at the detective school without disguising themselves at all, but that’s about it.
Is It Any Good?: Oh dear god, it’s complete dreck on toast. Let’s try to count all the ways this thing sucks:
What we all expect from B-grade four-girl moe comedies: flat, clichéd, annoying characters, a near-nonexistent plot that revels in the inane, and a saccharine edgeless tone that makes Pretty Cure look like Berserk.
Some of the laziest, most painful “comedy” I’ve seen in an anime in quite a while. Most of the jokes boil down to “reaction faces!” or “someone fell over!” or “flamboyant homo villain with pointy nipples!” (Relatedly: MAKE IT STOP.)
A shrieky baby-talking opening theme that makes me want to punch everyone within reach.
Cheap-ass animation.
But the worst thing about this show is how it takes an interesting premise — great male detectives reincarnated as teenage girls attending a detective school — and wastes it on aimless moe garbage.

Tantei Opera Milky Holmes: Episodes 1-4

The Plot: Milky Holmes are a quartet of airheaded moeblobs attending a school for superpowered detectives. They’re the stars of the school until they randomly lose their powers during a fight with stripperiffic arch-rival Arsene. The girls’ depowered state gives them a perfect excuse to blow off all that tedious crime-fighting and mystery-solving, instead opting to fart around and do moe shit all day. Seriously, if you are a fan of any of the famous detectives name-dropped in this series, this is absolutely the last show you’ll want to watch.

Is This A Magical Girl Show?: Nope. I’m booting it out of the project.

There’s no secrecy, no transformations, and no dual identities, except for the villains. Plus, while the heroines have magical powers, they lose them in the first episode and spend the series as muggles, which sort of kills the whole point of a Magical Girl show, i.e. a show about girls who use magic.

On the flip side, Arsene is a personality-switching rival in the same mold as Pixy Misa, and her minions all do the Clark Kenting thing, working at the detective school without disguising themselves at all, but that’s about it.

Is It Any Good?: Oh dear god, it’s complete dreck on toast. Let’s try to count all the ways this thing sucks:

  • What we all expect from B-grade four-girl moe comedies: flat, clichéd, annoying characters, a near-nonexistent plot that revels in the inane, and a saccharine edgeless tone that makes Pretty Cure look like Berserk.
  • Some of the laziest, most painful “comedy” I’ve seen in an anime in quite a while. Most of the jokes boil down to “reaction faces!” or “someone fell over!” or “flamboyant homo villain with pointy nipples!” (Relatedly: MAKE IT STOP.)
  • A shrieky baby-talking opening theme that makes me want to punch everyone within reach.
  • Cheap-ass animation.
  • But the worst thing about this show is how it takes an interesting premise — great male detectives reincarnated as teenage girls attending a detective school — and wastes it on aimless moe garbage.

I’m a little late to the party, but I just found out that Viz is re-dubbing the original Sailor Moon anime!?!?!

Holy shit, I never dreamed this day would come! No more cousin incest! No more Silver Millenium Moon Crystal! No more Sailor Says baloney! No more teenagers who sound like congested forty-somethings! And maybe we’ll finally get to see Season 5!!

I have a few thoughts regarding the new casting:

  1. I love it when Stephenie Sheh gets to escape her type-casting as “squeaky wilting flower” and do something more interesting. She was brilliant as Akira in Lucky Star, so I’m looking forward to her voicing Usagi’s many mood-swings.
  2. Todd Haberkorn as Jadeite is going to be hilarious.
  3. Why Artemis, you’re suddenly so handsome and dashing!  Oh man, oh man, I hope the new anime shows Artemis in his human form from the manga, I might die of a catastrophic nose-hemorrhage.

Anonymous asked:

Do you know any MG anime where the girls actually fight crime? (Like,stopping purse snatchers and what not.)

Not many; most of them fight monsters. The only ones I know of are:

  • Saint Tail: She steals items that have previously been stolen and returns them to their rightful owners.
  • Tonde Buurin/Super Pig: She’s a more traditional superhero who stops mundane criminals like thieves, bullies, etc.
  • Cutey Honey, arguably: While Panther Claw is run by monstrous cat-ladies, they’re fundamentally a crime syndicate that steals valuable pieces of art, sculptures, jewelry, etc.

That’s about it.

Anonymous asked:

Which do you think are better - magical girl Warriors or magical girl witches?

I prefer Magic Warriors because I like butt-kicking and lesbian subtext. Then again, Sugar Sugar Rune is one of my favorite MG manga and it’s a Cute Witch story, albeit with plenty of butt-kicking and lesbian subtext.

fireyfobbitmedicine asked:

Do you know any magical girl mangas that don't have animes

Ooh, yes I do:

Stuff I’ve read:

Codename Sailor V: Prototype of Sailor Moon. Great on its own merits and as a historical piece.

ION: Pseudo-magical-girl sciency stuff. Arina Tanemura’s early work.

Mink: Sciency magic idol singer. By the author of Saint Tail. Bad. Not offensive, just incompetent.

Carat: Cross-dressing parody AWESOMENESS. I NEED TO DO A PROPER REVIEW OF THIS ONE.

Mistress Fortune: Co-ed esper duo fighting aliens. Arina Tanemura again. I found the main characters too annoying to read beyond the first few chapters.

Stuff I haven’t read:

Shadow Lady: Kaitou girl with a slinky black leather outfit.

Hyper Rune: By a CLAMP member.

Zodiac PI: Detective with astrology powers.

Pixie Pop: Age-enhancing soda.

Miracle Dieter Miyuki: A parody, obvs.

Gaba Kawa: Demon girl comes to the human world.

Anonymous asked:

Do you have any tips of mg shows where the main characters are fans of the genre?

Let’s see, the one that leaps to mind is Cardcaptor Sakura, where the heroine’s BFF, Tomoyo, is a Magical Girl nerd. She videotapes Sakura’s escapades and creates endless themed outfits for her since Sakura’s “transformation” doesn’t change her clothes at all.

TV Tropes tells me that Corrector Yui and Blossom of PPGZ are also MG fangirls, though I haven’t watched those shows yet.

bromez asked:

Hey, just discovered your blog, like what you've got going on. I also wanted to pass by a book recommendation that might shed some light on the whole "why does hentai have so much rape stuff" in it. Shutting Out The Sun is a really brilliant nonfiction book written by a Western journalist who's been living in Japan for a few decades named Michael Zielenziger. He talks about a lot of the social issues that modern Japan is dealing with, and the sex/porn stuff is really enlightening.

Wow, that looks like a really cool book, thanks for the rec! I’m looking at the Amazon preview pages, and I’m already seeing another possible answer to my question: self-imposed gender segregation. Half of Japanese men polled say they don’t have any female friends, and women poll similarly. If you never hang out with or talk to a certain type of person, it’s easier to dehumanize them in your mind, and therefore easier to stomach watching terrible things happen to them in your porn. Another possible answer: The deadlock between the genders — men who demand a traditional stay-at-home wife, and women who refuse to get married or have kids at all because they don’t want to give up their careers — I can see how that could spawn some resentful rape porn for men who feel cheated out of what society promised them.

Man, every time I read about real-life modern Japan, I get depressed. Though at least it makes me feel better about living in Recession-era America. Like, hey, it could be worse!

Anonymous asked:

I know Dream Hunter Rem is a proto-magical girl warrior show, but would Dream Dimension Hunter Fandora count as one as well?

Hey, I’ve actually seen that one! (Well the first ep anyway.) I would say no. It’s set in a fantasy world where magic/high tech is common, there’s no secret dual identities, no traveling to non-magical worlds. It’s just a standard fantasy/sci-fi mash-up.