Anonymous asked:

Favourite magical girls that fight in pairs? Or just a list, tbh, because I'm not sure there's many.

Magical Girl Duos!

  • Miracle Girls: Psychic shojo twins.
  • Hyper Doll: Busty bad-tempered alien warriors.
  • Makeruna Makendou: Kendo sisters.
  • Futari wa Precure: The most famous duo.
  • Fushigiboshi no Futagohime: Foofy princess sisters.
  • Splash Star: I’m having déjà vu, I really think so!
  • Umi Monogatari: A mermaid and a human.
  • Heartcatch Precure: Wallflower and genki girl.
  • PSG: Horny bad-tempered angel warriors.
  • Suite Precure: Belligerent sexual tensionnnnn.
  • Twin Angel: Boing boing boing boing boing

My faves are Heartcatch and PSG.

Anonymous asked:

Just curious, do you know any series where the magical girl character(s) doesn't require/does not bother with secrecy that you in your opinion consider part of the genre?

Basically, if a show doesn’t use secrecy, but is steeped in the genre in every other respect, I count it as part of the genre. If it quacks like a duck, etc. Examples are:

  • Galaxy Fraulein Yuna: Takes place in a sci-fi universe, but it’s so clearly a riff on Sailor Moon that I couldn’t omit it.
  • Fushigiboshi No Futagohime: My go-to example of “Quacks like a duck, but is not a duck.” I mean just look at it. It screams Magical Girl.
  • Akazukin Chacha: My go-to example of a franchise re-tooling itself in order to capitalize on Sailor Moon’s popularity. Clearly wants to be part of the MG club, despite not following all the rules.
  • Mao-chan, PSG, Dai Mahou Touge, and Majokko Tsukune-chan: These are all parodies, especially the last two, so I give them a pass to play fast and loose with the rules.
  • Any show where a muggle travels to the magic world for the bulk of the story: Rayearth is the prime example, but others include Genmu Senki Leda and CosPrayers. There’s still mild secrecy because when they return home, the girls can’t tell anyone about their adventures, because who’d believe them. However the constant pressure of juggling dual lives is absent.

It’s all rather subjective, though.

Anonymous asked:

If this has been asked before, I'm sorry, but - what would you say are the biggest cloches in the magical girl genre? Could you please give some examples?

Well if we define a “cloche” as a bell not just a trope but a tired and overused trope, then my picks for the biggest cloches of the genre would be:

  1. Clark Kenting — when a character’s MG form looks the same as her civilian, and no one notices. I understand that it makes less work for the character designers, and in a show with a lot of MG characters, it can makes things look less cluttered. It’s still stupid.
  2. Heroines wearing PIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIINK! End pink’s tyrannical stranglehold on girls’ media! An especially weird cloche because none of the four pioneers of Magical-Girl-land (Sally, Akko, Cutey Honey, and Sailor Moon) wore pink.
  3. The dumbass heroine: The girl who has no smarts, talents, skills, or redeeming qualities except for her pure and loving heart. Let’s put her in charge of saving the world! This cloche is especially grating because it’s meant to be self-insert wish fulfillment for the shojo viewership, much like Bella Swan in Twilol. This character type also shows up a lot in moe, but annoys me less because it’s providing simple wank fodder instead of directly insulting the audience.
  4. Collect all the things. This one only annoys me when it’s used lazily. A MacGuffin hunt can work if the hunt has a deep personal meaning for the heroine (Princess Tutu) or if the MacGuffins have a practical use (Cardcaptor Sakura, Heartcatch Precure) or if the method used to acquire them raises interesting ethical dilemmas (Sugar Sugar Rune, PMMM), but a lot of shows seem to use it purely because they can’t think of any other way to drive the plot.
Modern Magic Made Simple: Episodes 1-6
The Plot: In modern Japan, there are mages who cast magic that looks like computer code. Koyomi, an under-achieving student, wants to improve herself by learning magic from Misa, a busty mage who makes her living by writing magical brainwashing spells for businesses who want to draw in more consumers. There’s also Yumiko, a descendent of mages who loses her panties a lot, and Guibarthez, a villainous dude who wants to resurrect a legendary evil mage. Also, time travel.
Is This A Magical Girl Show?: I HAVE NO FUCKING CLUE.
Is It Any Good?: NO GOD NO IT’S TERRIBLE. I can’t remember the last time I watched an anime that was so bafflingly incoherent. I am amazed I managed to grasp as much of the plot as I described above. The storytelling is disorganized, skipping back and forth in time without much rhyme or reason, characters aren’t properly introduced, a constant stream of technobabble tries and fails to explain how magic works in this universe (maybe it makes more sense if you’re a computer programmer, idk), and it all results in a confusing and boring show that’s agonizing to sit through. People, it takes effort to tell a story this badly.
Everything else about the show is just meh — shallow cliché characters, repetitive fight scenes, awkward and random fanservice, underdeveloped relationships, pleasant but bland visuals — so the brain-hurting narrative is the only thing that stands out.
Seriously Though, Is It A Magical Girl Show?: I DON’T KNOOOOOOW.
There’s secrecy of a sort because magic is invisible to muggles. Therefore, the mages can use magic in public in broad daylight without causing problems. However, all the corporate guys employing Misa know about her magic, and overall it seems like no one’s putting much effort into maintaining the masquerade.
Magic is unlimited (I think), is a talent you’re born with, and is a skill learned either from a tutor or from books. This makes MMMS most similar to Doremi, although in that show, the tutors were from another world, in keeping with Cute Witch traditions.
The show is vague about where magical talent comes from. Misa and Yumiko are both descended from mages, while Koyomi and Kaho are newcomers to magic who apparently had the potential but never knew it.
No dual identities. This gets back to the wishy-washy secrecy I mentioned: Most Magical Girls are under constant pressure to hide their double life from everyone they know. That pressure is nonexistent in MMMS. Despite being mages in a muggle world, none of these girls is leading a double life.
No henshins.
No cutesy mascot mentor.
The girls do fight monsters-of-the-week puppeted by the villain, although they sort of stumble sideways into this mission.
The traditional mages call their attacks, but the computer mages don’t.
After much deliberation and beating my head against the wall, I’m going to say no, it’s not a Magical Girl show owing to the lack of a double life and the absence of other stock MG tropes. Besides, even if I kept it in the project, I’d have nothing intelligent to say about it because I’d still have no fucking clue what was going on.

Modern Magic Made Simple: Episodes 1-6

The Plot: In modern Japan, there are mages who cast magic that looks like computer code. Koyomi, an under-achieving student, wants to improve herself by learning magic from Misa, a busty mage who makes her living by writing magical brainwashing spells for businesses who want to draw in more consumers. There’s also Yumiko, a descendent of mages who loses her panties a lot, and Guibarthez, a villainous dude who wants to resurrect a legendary evil mage. Also, time travel.

Is This A Magical Girl Show?: I HAVE NO FUCKING CLUE.

Is It Any Good?: NO GOD NO IT’S TERRIBLE. I can’t remember the last time I watched an anime that was so bafflingly incoherent. I am amazed I managed to grasp as much of the plot as I described above. The storytelling is disorganized, skipping back and forth in time without much rhyme or reason, characters aren’t properly introduced, a constant stream of technobabble tries and fails to explain how magic works in this universe (maybe it makes more sense if you’re a computer programmer, idk), and it all results in a confusing and boring show that’s agonizing to sit through. People, it takes effort to tell a story this badly.

Everything else about the show is just meh — shallow cliché characters, repetitive fight scenes, awkward and random fanservice, underdeveloped relationships, pleasant but bland visuals — so the brain-hurting narrative is the only thing that stands out.

Seriously Though, Is It A Magical Girl Show?: I DON’T KNOOOOOOW.

  • There’s secrecy of a sort because magic is invisible to muggles. Therefore, the mages can use magic in public in broad daylight without causing problems. However, all the corporate guys employing Misa know about her magic, and overall it seems like no one’s putting much effort into maintaining the masquerade.
  • Magic is unlimited (I think), is a talent you’re born with, and is a skill learned either from a tutor or from books. This makes MMMS most similar to Doremi, although in that show, the tutors were from another world, in keeping with Cute Witch traditions.
  • The show is vague about where magical talent comes from. Misa and Yumiko are both descended from mages, while Koyomi and Kaho are newcomers to magic who apparently had the potential but never knew it.
  • No dual identities. This gets back to the wishy-washy secrecy I mentioned: Most Magical Girls are under constant pressure to hide their double life from everyone they know. That pressure is nonexistent in MMMS. Despite being mages in a muggle world, none of these girls is leading a double life.
  • No henshins.
  • No cutesy mascot mentor.
  • The girls do fight monsters-of-the-week puppeted by the villain, although they sort of stumble sideways into this mission.
  • The traditional mages call their attacks, but the computer mages don’t.

After much deliberation and beating my head against the wall, I’m going to say no, it’s not a Magical Girl show owing to the lack of a double life and the absence of other stock MG tropes. Besides, even if I kept it in the project, I’d have nothing intelligent to say about it because I’d still have no fucking clue what was going on.

Hyperdimension Neptunia: Episodes 1-5
The Plot: Hyperdimension Neptunia takes place in a fantasy world where everything is an allegory for the video game console wars. Our heroines are goddesses (consoles), each ruling over her own country (company) with the help of her little sister (handheld), and they alternate between competing for magical energy ($$$$) and teaming up against the villains (digital piracy).
Is This A Magical Girl Show?: No.
No secrecy.
It takes place in a fantasy world where magic is commonplace. Nobody ever goes to or comes from Earth.
It doesn’t fit any of the subgenre rules: The girls’ magic is limited to fighting, like in a Magic Warrior show, but they’re naturally magical, like in a Cute Witch show.
As a rule, Magical Girls are foot-soldiers employed by a higher power, like a queen or a boss or their own parents. In Neptunia, the girls are the higher power — goddesses ruling over whole countries.
Relatedly, there are no cutesy mascot mentors, nor mentors of any kind for the girls.
However, the show clearly takes a lot of influence from the genre:
The girls have dual identities — their ordinary form and their goddess form — complete with different appearances, names, and personalities, though the personality shift is usually mild.
The girls transform via a traditional Sailor-Moon-style henshin, though they don’t require a magic object to do so.
The little sisters have a slightly more MG-ish arc, learning to transform and becoming fully-fledged goddesses over the course of the show.
The fights are reminiscent of MG fights, with a mixture of melee combat and energy attacks with silly names.
I’m booting Neptunia out of the main project, but I’ll still include it in discussions of henshins and dual personae.
Is It Any Good?: As a fan of Hetalia, I think Neptunia is a great idea, but unfortunately it fails in the execution. The show is, in a word, impenetrable. The more familiar you are with the details of recent video game history, the more you’ll get out of the experience; the less knowledgeable you are, the more confused and bored you’ll be, and the more you’ll wish for some kind of Neptunia Cliffnotes. Even when I did get the references, some still fell flat, like when one girl is carrying a bag of peaches and gets attacked by a large turtle. Har har.
So unless you’re a gaming history buff, you’re left with a meh action/fantasy show welded to a meh moe/bishoujo (bishmoejo?) show. The characters are all flat clichés — not annoying, but not interesting either — and there’s way too many of them: 4 goddesses + 4 little sisters + 3 mutual friends + the villains makes the show feel cluttered. Visuals are pleasant enough, although the fanservice frequently takes a sharp turn into Hentai Creepyville, with the girls getting captured and molested by blob creatures, tentacle bondage, a monster with a huge slobbery tongue, etc.
The one notable part of the show is its focus on sisterhood. Despite the title, the story really belongs to Neptunia’s sister and the other handhelds, and their struggle between wanting to grow up and out of their big sisters’ shadows and wanting to remain as pampered, responsibility-free little sisters indefinitely. This theme gives the show its substance, though it wasn’t enough to keep me interested.

Hyperdimension Neptunia: Episodes 1-5

The Plot: Hyperdimension Neptunia takes place in a fantasy world where everything is an allegory for the video game console wars. Our heroines are goddesses (consoles), each ruling over her own country (company) with the help of her little sister (handheld), and they alternate between competing for magical energy ($$$$) and teaming up against the villains (digital piracy).

Is This A Magical Girl Show?: No.

  • No secrecy.
  • It takes place in a fantasy world where magic is commonplace. Nobody ever goes to or comes from Earth.
  • It doesn’t fit any of the subgenre rules: The girls’ magic is limited to fighting, like in a Magic Warrior show, but they’re naturally magical, like in a Cute Witch show.
  • As a rule, Magical Girls are foot-soldiers employed by a higher power, like a queen or a boss or their own parents. In Neptunia, the girls are the higher power — goddesses ruling over whole countries.
  • Relatedly, there are no cutesy mascot mentors, nor mentors of any kind for the girls.

However, the show clearly takes a lot of influence from the genre:

  • The girls have dual identities — their ordinary form and their goddess form — complete with different appearances, names, and personalities, though the personality shift is usually mild.
  • The girls transform via a traditional Sailor-Moon-style henshin, though they don’t require a magic object to do so.
  • The little sisters have a slightly more MG-ish arc, learning to transform and becoming fully-fledged goddesses over the course of the show.
  • The fights are reminiscent of MG fights, with a mixture of melee combat and energy attacks with silly names.

I’m booting Neptunia out of the main project, but I’ll still include it in discussions of henshins and dual personae.

Is It Any Good?: As a fan of Hetalia, I think Neptunia is a great idea, but unfortunately it fails in the execution. The show is, in a word, impenetrable. The more familiar you are with the details of recent video game history, the more you’ll get out of the experience; the less knowledgeable you are, the more confused and bored you’ll be, and the more you’ll wish for some kind of Neptunia Cliffnotes. Even when I did get the references, some still fell flat, like when one girl is carrying a bag of peaches and gets attacked by a large turtle. Har har.

So unless you’re a gaming history buff, you’re left with a meh action/fantasy show welded to a meh moe/bishoujo (bishmoejo?) show. The characters are all flat clichés — not annoying, but not interesting either — and there’s way too many of them: 4 goddesses + 4 little sisters + 3 mutual friends + the villains makes the show feel cluttered. Visuals are pleasant enough, although the fanservice frequently takes a sharp turn into Hentai Creepyville, with the girls getting captured and molested by blob creatures, tentacle bondage, a monster with a huge slobbery tongue, etc.

The one notable part of the show is its focus on sisterhood. Despite the title, the story really belongs to Neptunia’s sister and the other handhelds, and their struggle between wanting to grow up and out of their big sisters’ shadows and wanting to remain as pampered, responsibility-free little sisters indefinitely. This theme gives the show its substance, though it wasn’t enough to keep me interested.